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Best portable toilet 2018 – [Buyer’s Guide]

Last Updated November 1, 2018
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Norman RyanHey, I’m Norman Ryan. After spending over 33 hours comparing at least 23 portable toilet, I am recommending the best portable toilet of 2018

I’ll brush up on how to choose the best portable toilet and examine things like materials, quality, and weight. I hope that my Top 3 list will provide you great options in buying the right fit for you.

Let’s get to it!

Best portable toilet of 2018

Not all portable toilet are created equal though. After carefully examining the reviews and ratings of the people who have used them earlier this listicle has been made.

The above tidbits will bring you closer to selecting portable toilet that best serves your needs and as per your budget. Here are the customer reviews of some of the best portable toilet of 2018.

Test Results and Ratings

Rank №1 №2 №3
Product
Total 4.8 4.5 4.3
Design
5 points
5 points
4 points
Versatility
5 points
4 points
4 points
Durability
4 points
4 points
4 points
Price
5 points
5 points
5 points
Awards 1
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How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the portable toilet by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

№1 – SereneLife Outdoor Portable Toilet with Carry Bag

 
SereneLife Outdoor Portable Toilet with Carry Bag

Pros
GO IN COMFORT ANYWHERE: Whether heading off for an unforgettable backwoods camping trip or traveling with the family, this portable toilet kit by SereneLife lets you go wherever and whenever nature calls!
#1 PORTABLE TRAVEL TOILET: Boating enthusiasts, frequent travelers & roadtripping families turn to our compact traveling toilet seat because it can tag along without taking up too much room or weighing your down.
Cons
For such a price and the level of quality it can’t even have any cons, only pick holes.
 
Total:
4.8

Why did this portable toilet win the first place?

I also liked the delivery service that was fast and quick to react. It was delivered on the third day. The product is very strong. Its material is stable and doesn’t crack. I am very happy with the purchase. It is definitely worth its money. The product is top-notch! I really enjoy the design. It is compact, comfortable and reliable. And it looks amazing!

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Design
5

5star

Versatility
5

5star

Durability
4

4star

Price
5

5star

 

 

№2 – Green Elephant Pop Up Utilitent Privacy Portable Camping

 
Green Elephant Pop Up Utilitent  Privacy Portable Camping

Pros
SUPERIOR QUALITY CONSTRUCTION – Made of quality water-repellant polyester, this portable toilet and changing room tent is made to last! Rugged reliable material, a heavy-duty door zipper that won’t break, stitches that hold, a strong build that stays in shape – all combine to bring you superb dependability in a shelter you can count on.
Cons
Can be tedious to clean up.
Expensive more then others and featured a bit less then other in our high-end picks.
 
Total:
4.5

Why did this portable toilet come in second place?

This is a pretty decent product that perfectly fitted the interior of our office. I like this product. For such a low price, I didn’t even hope it to be any better. It’s decently made. Seems that the material is good. It has a very beautiful color but I don’t really like the texture. Managers explained me all the details about the product range, price, and delivery.

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Design
5

5star

Versatility
4

4star

Durability
4

4star

Price
5

5star

 

 

№3 – Camco 41541 Standard Portable Travel Toilet

 
Camco 41541 Standard Portable Travel Toilet

Pros
5.3 gallon holding tank is detachable; 2.5 gallon flush tank
Sealing slide valve locks in odors and protects against leakage
Side latches secure the tank to the toilet
Cons
Extremely expensive.
The manual is inaccurate and confusing..
 
Total:
4.3

Why did this portable toilet take third place?

It doesn’t squeaks nor bents. Looks great in my apartment. It is inconvenient to use due to the size. I am going to get something different next time. I liked the design. We’ve been using it for 2 months and it still looks like brand new. A very convenient model. It is affordable and made of high-quality materials.

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Design
4

4star

Versatility
4

4star

Durability
4

4star

Price
5

5star

 

 

portable toilet Buyer’s Guide

If you keep the before points in mind, you can easily go out to the market and buy portable toilet, right? No!

Value Section

Make your outdoor trip even more exciting and comfortable and get the power of these portable toilets right in your hands. They are certainly very light in weight, so carrying them along shall be no problem at all. There are a few available with privacy too, as they are protected with tents or screens. The entire waste is just going to be packed and carried, so this would be a benefit to the environment as well.

Here are few pointers to be kept in mind

A portable, ideal toilet would be easy to carry, lightweight, easy to install and reliable when there is no other option available. This is a revolutionary product that has re-defined camping and motivates the adventurous aspect in most of you camping fanatics.

Sturdy Base

Nobody would wish to own a toilet piece that is weak because they are always unreliable and not long lasting. But instead possessing a toilet with sturdy base guarantees you that the toilet will be solid, strong and reliable which is an advantage.

Flush Tank Completed with Seat

I love this portable toilet since it’s similar to my permanent flush toilet in my household. It functions the same and has a flush tank completed with a seat so using this toilet is very comfortable too.

Waste Tank

The waste tank has a 5.gallon capacity with a secured gate that locks odors away. It also prevents the toilet from leaking making it very environmental-friendly. Plus its easily detachable so cleaning and emptying it becomes very simple.

Easy to Install

The toilet is very easy to install and doesn’t need more labor. And if you are handy like me it’s very simple to set it up alone. I love how it’s very comfortable and its diversity since it fits both adults and children.

Sanitary

It’s very hygienically since the mesh holder holds the waste kit firmly from slipping and spilling its contents. It has zero leakages too because the patent drip edge located under the toilet seat’s prevents and leakages and keeps the bag from coming into contact with the wastes.

New & Improved Chemical Toilet

The toilet is constructed using the modern technology and consists of parts that makes it very effective. It has a removable waste tank for easy cleaning and emptying.

Size Dimensions

With 6.inches in height, 13.inches in depth and a 1inch in depth it makes the toilet have a smaller footprint. The smaller footprint also facilitates the easy movement of this toilet, and it occupy smaller space in your car truck whenever you are travelling with it.

Full-Size Seat

The toilet seat is full size just like your ordinary household toilet seat. It fits an adult perfectly, and the seat has a seat cover that makes it very comfortable whenever one is using it.

Plus the seat is made of a sturdy material so it can allow anyone to use the toilet regardless of their weight. With a weight limit of 440 lbs.

Removable Waste Tank and Water Tank

The toilet has a detachable waste tank that facilitates easy emptying and cleaning the toilet. The waste tank is totally sealed, so there is zero leakages.

The water tank facilitates easy toilet cleaning. The water tank holds water that can be used to flush up to 50 flushes.

Foldable

The flushable toilet is exactly what its name suggests: It’s a portable toilet that works more or less like your toilet back home. After doing your thing, you flush the toilet with water and the waste is stored for later disposal.

These toilets are generally bigger and offer the comfort of a flushing toilet at the expense of some mobility. They are suitable, for example, if you plan to stay in the same place for a longer time. They are also ideal for installation in an RV or on a boat.

Bear in mind that the waste collected needs to be disposed of and it must be done in a suitable location. This means you might need to stay in places that have dedicated facilities for the disposal of waste.

A bag toilet is a much simpler concept. The waste goes into a bag containing chemicals which turn liquid waste into solid. The bag should be biodegradable and can then be taken away and buried. This design is generally more portable and needs less time to install.

Bag toilets are generally cheaper and are more suitable for excursions when you will not be staying in the same place for such a long time.

Other Points To Consider

If you choose a flushable toilet, you will need to consider the volume. This determines how many times it can be flushed before needing to be emptied. If it is destined for use by a family over, say, a period of a week, you will need a larger volume.

Ease Of Set Up And Operation

When thinking about which toilet to buy, you should consider how quickly and easily you need to set it up. If it is for shorter-term use, a bag toilet might be more appropriate as they are usually very simple to set up and use.

With flushable toilets, you need to consider how long it takes to install the toilet as well as how easy it is to empty.

Comfort And Strength

If you are buying a portable toilet, you obviously expect a certain amount of comfort and the level of comfort you require is a point to think about. Furthermore, for larger people, you need to be sure that the toilet is sturdy enough to support your weight.

Our Rating

This is a full adult-sized flushable toilet which is tough, comfortable and quite capable of taking the weight of a heavier individual. Its design is suitable for installation in an RV or a boat.

The flush is primed by pumping and is then activated by pressing a button which releases the waste into a container below. Each pressurized flush uses less than a pint of water and with moderate use for two people, you will only have to empty it every two or three days or possibly longer.

This is a relatively expensive option and it is a good choice for someone who values comfort. If you are buying for a boat or RV, you should be aware that the mounting brackets are not supplied and need to be bought separately.

This toilet is easy to set up and install and is also very easy to empty and clean. There is a clear level indicator so you know when it needs to be emptied.

One thing to remember is that it this toilet is designed as a full-sized and comfortable unit and, as such, is not suitable for someone who is looking for a more portable design – although it is small and light enough to pack into a car if needed.

Overall, a great option if you want something to put in your RV or on a boat. It does what it is supposed to do, doesn’t release bad smells, it’s easy to use and clean, and is well-made and sturdy. A good choice for someone willing to pay for a little luxury when on the move.

The Winner

If you are outside and you don’t want to ‘go’ in the woods, there are many portable toilet options available. The three flushable versions I looked at here are all good choices if you are looking for something to install in an RV, on a boat or for use on a campsite.

Camco 5.Gallon

Some models, like composting toilets, are compatible with standard doodle bag so that you can bury it in order to nourish plants. This means that you’ll contribute to the environment, which is a big bonus (obviously).

Wide selection

One more reason to use these toilets is a wide selection. Since there are numerous models to choose from, there is something for everybody, so you will easily choose the one that best fits your needs.

As mentioned, there are many portable toilets, including composting ones. However, composting toilets are a bit pricey. Also, composting toilets are a better choice for trailers, cabins, etc. For camping, boating, tailgating, you should stick to portable toilets, as they are cheaper and still get the job done.

Welcome to my site!

The following are our top picks for bidets, which have been chosen based on expert online ratings, research, and customer reviews. Read on to browse our top picks for bidets.

Although the Toto Washlet S300e is our top pick, for various reasons laid out in the slides below, you should also consider the Toto Washlet C100, the Brondell GS-70 GoSpa Travel Bidet, the Bliss Electric Bidet Seat, and the GenieBidet.

Toto THU9090R 6-Inch Wash Let Hose Extension Kit

Overall, it’s a good value for the price, and beginners won’t be intimidated by it.

Featured

Whether you are primitive camping, have a favorite tent site or use a pop-up camper for your outdoor adventures, you are probably missing one thing that would make your outing much more comfortable. Can you guess what it is? Well, if you have ever experienced ‘nature calling’ without a bathroom facility in the immediate vicinity- you guessed correctly- that one thing is a portable toilet. In fact, if you have females or kids in your camping party, a portable camping toilet can make everyone’s trip much more enjoyable.

Self-contained toilets

These are a popular option for campers to effectively manage waste. Many self-contained portable camping toilets feature a lid, comfortable seat and flush function similar to that of an airplane toilet. They are designed to effectively hold waste for longer camping trips. Some models even come with a compact plumbing system and holding tank for the waste.

What to look for in a Camping Toilet

There are a number of factors you’ll need to consider when you are ready to purchase a portable toilet for camping. Of course, you’ll want to explore all your options as you think about which one will best suits your needs, the amount of storage space you’ll have to stow the toilet, as well as how much your budget will allow. When you are ready to shop, there are a number of companies that sell portable camping toilets online- which is super convenient, or you could visit a sporting goods store with a vast camping inventory. Wherever you ultimately purchase your camping toilet, it’s always a good idea to read all about the product before you buy, as well as the reviews.

Waste disposal

At some point you are going to need to empty your portable toilet. The question will be where? There are many water flush portable toilets that are convenient; however, you will need somewhere to dispose of the waste. Unfortunately, many primitive camping areas do not offer a place to empty your portable toilet, but if you are camping near an RV site, you can easily find a waste dump facility nearby. You also might want to check with your destination prior to leaving to see if they can accommodate waste disposal. Other portable toilets on the market come with biodegradable bags that are easy to get rid of in a designated campground site or open wooded area. One of the greatest benefits is that these ‘bags’ generally contain a powder that can turn liquid waste to solids. The bags are convenient because they can be buried in a inch hole- as long as they are disposed of at least 100 yards from the closest water source. Understandably, toilet paper takes time to break down, so you’ll probably want to pick up a couple of rolls that have the ability to disintegrate rapidly; these can be found in stores that sell camping supplies.

Volume of toilet

It will be important to consider the performance capacity (how much waste it can store) of your portable toilet- especially if you are looking to purchase a flush toilet. Some are designed just for a day or two and others can handle a week of camping. Obviously, a smaller one will suit your needs for a few overnight camping trips; but if you plan on camping longer than that you’ll want to look for how many flushes a toilet can handle before it needs emptying. Many manufacturers will state this information in the description or features of the toilet.

Easy set up or tear down

Easy disposal powdered lined bags that gel up liquid waste for easy handling.

Pressure assisted toilets

Pressure assisted toilets are known for their water saving features. This one only uses 1.gallons of water per flush, so an average family can use up to 2000 gallons of water per year. Unfortunately the seat is not included in the package, so you need to purchase it separately.

Comfort

You’d also want to consider which toilet makes you more comfortable. Some folks don’t mind using a bucket with the toilet seat as the lid. Others don’t even fancy a portable toilet; they’ll just use a plastic bag or liner for easier waste disposal.

Still, some people want the traditional toilet experience. Identifying the features that you like in a portable toilet is critical to picking the most comfortable unit for you.

Material Used To Construct The Toilet

Yes, the quality of material used in the craftsmanship of the toilet also matters. Some portable models use the elementary grade plastic material- this is similar to what you’ll find on an average container.

Other brands use high-quality plastic material which is much more durable. So, if you plan on using your new toilet regularly, I recommend you to consider the high-grade construction.

Waste Disposal

When filled, you portable toilet will need to be emptied so that you can continue using it. Now the worry is how you empty this waste. While the water flush toilets are somehow more convenient to use, you’ll need specific sites to unload them. Most RV sites provide such facilities, but if you’re traveling in wilds emptying can be a challenge.

Most regions have the restrictions of buying such waste- be sure to check before traveling. The biodegradable sacks designed for portable toilets are easier to empty in the countryside.

They come with a powder that solidifies liquid waste and can be buried. You should do this at least inches deep and in a location around 100 yards water from a water source. Since the toilet paper might take longer to break down, you’re advised to consider the disintegrating toilet paper available in camping supply stores.

Privacy

For most people, a portable toilet comes to mind when they think of boating or camping.

Another situation where the mobile unit will be of benefit to you is at the tailgate parties or picnics. In such cases, you’ll definitely need some bit of privacy when using the portable toilet. Though most of the portable toilets do not come with a privacy shelter, you can purchase one separately to offer a private area for users of the toilet.

Earthtec ETEC Non-Stick Sanitar

This loo out of Earthtec supplies a amount of distance in its holding tank, even five gallons to be more precise, which is fantastic. People who are looking for something to used in the out doors, as an example a camping or hiking trip, this might be considered a sensible choice.

Includes a pump to push against out your waste of its waste container and effectively limit smells escaping. This identical pump handle may be dragged to release the waste into the holding tank under so  if said tank is full, you may easily pour it out a anti dab spout making maintenance relatively simple.

Budget

If it comes to portable toilets, the more expensive is not necessarily best to suit the requirements. The higher-priced toilets might have features that you do care for, or else they might get a bigger size than you require. Pay careful attention to a budget, and do not spend longer than you want to.

The cassette toilet takes the porta-potty concept one step further but separates the seat/flush unit from the holding tank (cassette). It uses the same chemical-treatment system as the porta potty. Unlike the porta potty, however, the cassette is built in. The key difference is that the cassette is accessed from the outside of the caravan. Higher-spec models have an electric flushing mechanism.  Waste stored externally to toilet.  Considerably more expensive than portable toilets.

Composting

A composting toilet comes with the best credentials for leaving the smallest footprint on the planet. As the name implies, it turns solid waste into compost. As the composting process relies on evaporation, the only plumbing required for a composting toilet is ventilation. The resulting waste is good enough to fertilise your garden. Electric, vacuum-flush models are available. One of the best advantages of this kind of toilet is that it requires zero or little water to operate, thereby giving you more water for other uses.  Environmentally friendly.  Tend to stand taller than other toilets, making them difficult for small children.

Becoming a bidet convert

My mother wasn’t so jazzed about my adventure. She asked me what I was working on when we were out to dinner one night. I told her the premise of this guide. She sighed and put her forehead on the table. When I told my boyfriend about it, he was sort of bemused.

Pull Quote “It’s like a massage for your anus.” Sounds like something everyone should try at least once.

Much of the world does. If you think bidets are strange or silly, consider the point of view of many, many other people on the planet.

He’s now a recent college grad living in Montreal, where he has an attachment for his toilet in his apartment. When he isn’t at home and can’t use it, he says he feels “awful and disgusting”—a sentiment that many bidet owners expressed to me.

Pull Quote absolutely.” (She later noted that she found the idea of the appliance itself funny, but that while in the Peace Corps in Ethiopia, she had become used to the custom of taking a large water bottle into outhouses to rinse off with.) Olivia’s mom owns a bidet, and told her that she was excited we were going to be using them.

In the decade and a half since Amadou bought his first bidet attachment—he’s had the same one for that many years, and has purchased a second for the other toilet in his place—they’ve become more and more popular. Plumbing manufacturer Toto has sold 40 million bidet attachments, dubbed “washlets,” since launching its first model in 1980. About million of those were purchased between 201and 201New brands, such as Bio Bidet and Tushy, have popped up, and so have new websites to distribute them, like Bidet.org, to cash in on the trend.

I have a theory for why these things took a while to catch on in the States. While bidets aren’t as inherently icky as toilet paper—I say this as the converted—simply making the switch involves thinking about the ins and outs of sitting on the toilet.

I hated thinking about this stuff as much as the next person. Toilet humor, for example, asks that I derive pleasure from something that I find inherently gross. I told my boyfriend this when we first were dating. Many months later, by the end of bidet testing, I was wandering out of his bathroom casually complaining about how strange it was to have to wipe my butt (still to his surprise). I daresay I’ve also become more okay with making fart jokes.

Pull Quote

As for why you’d use a bidet, the most repeated logic that I heard while researching this piece goes more or less like this: If you got mud on your hand, you wouldn’t wipe it off with a paper towel, would you? Of course not, you’re not a slob. But after speaking to a doctor, I confirmed that wiping isn’t actually unhygienic or unhealthy in the same way that dry-wiping your hands is (people don’t eat with their butts), so feel free to not be shamed by a rhetorical question. America does not have some national health problem wherein our buttholes are too dirty.

The medical and environmental claims

Manufacturers tout health concerns as a big reason to use bidets. But when I dug into the research with the help of Dr. John Swartzberg, I found that there’s not a lot of hard evidence to support the claims. No data suggests that they prevent urinary-tract infections, and researchers have seen no medical reason to wash the inside of the vagina (as the feminine-wash feature on bidets allows). One study suggests they can reduce pressure in the rectum—and thereby, perhaps, help alleviate hemorrhoids and anal fissures. If you have anal itchiness, and cannot find an underlying cause in need of treatment, using a bidet will help you avoid toilet paper—a plus, if you find that rubbing the area makes the situation worse. If you plan to use a bidet for any health reason whatsoever, check in with your doctor for help in monitoring your condition.

So, a bidet might not be crucial for your health, but what about the environment? Although a bidet doesn’t require as much toilet paper—you’ll still likely want to use a couple of squares to wipe off—it’s kind of, well, a wash.

A bidet will definitely save you from having to stock up on toilet paper as frequently. This is an aspect I really like: the apartment that I lived in when I tested these had a tiny bathroom, shared regularly by four people plus assorted friends and significant others. Being able to keep just a roll or two in the bathroom at a time and not worrying about restocking as often was a huge plus.

While it’s true that people in the US use nearly 40 billion rolls a year, toilet paper breaks down pretty easily, so it isn’t a menace to the environment after you use it. Bidets themselves use water (though not enough to make your utility bills jump) and electricity, not to mention that they take resources to manufacture and ship. I suspect you do save the environment some grief by cutting down a little on paper products, though the evidence doesn’t seem convincing enough to pat yourself on the back just because you own one of these devices.

One thing is certain: Bidets are better than wet wipes, which can clog sewers. Yes, even the “flushable” variety.

For my first experience with a bidet, I took the train from Brooklyn, New York, 4minutes uptown to a Toto showroom on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. I entered the store and nervousIy asked where the bidets were. I quickly explained to a salesperson named Joel that I wasn’t buying, I just had a ton of questions and a reporter’s notebook.

Joel explained the features of the Toto washlet to me and then escorted me to a model bathroom to meet the company’s futuristic centerpiece: the Neorest 550, an entirely hands-free toilet. From lid lift to rinse-off to flush, it’s all remote controlled, Joel explained—hardly any contact necessary.

The toilet lid lifted as we approached. Joel picked up a square remote and started pushing buttons. The seat moved up and down on command (great “especially with gentlemen in the family”). He remotely activated the turbo flush. Joel explained that the Neorest sprays with sanitized electrolyte water, the kind that’s used to spray vegetables at the grocery store. “You can’t wash your vegetables in the toilet, but with that water—” “You could!” I exclaimed, finishing his sentence.

He left me alone and closed the door, and I sat on the toilet. I was too excited to notice, but the moment you sit down, fancy bidets like this one “pre-mist” the bowl with a slight whirring noise. The seat was already preheated.

How we picked and tested

You don’t need to go full Neorest to make your bathroom experience special, but we decided that we wanted our pick to at least have features that come standard on electric bidets, namely a heated seat and warm water. We were also interested in bidets with air dryers, though the lack of one wasn’t a dealbreaker. The point of a bidet is to make your bathroom luxurious.

Some models come with an enema-wash function. “This is a horrible idea,” UC Berkeley’s Dr. John Swartzberg told me. “Not only is it unnecessary, but it could cause damage to the anal and rectal area.” Don’t pay extra money for a bidet with an enema-wash function. Many bidets come with this feature anyway. Use at your own risk.

Ultimately we selected five bidets to test. I wanted to know what would most closely reproduce the feeling of luxury that I experienced in the showroom. That meant finding a bidet that would generate a stream of water at a reasonable temperature with enough pressure to get me clean but still gentle enough to be comfortable. It had to be adjustable, too—many people, each with different preferences, should be able to use the same bidet and have a good experience. I also wanted to find something with a remote that wouldn’t be confusing; guests should be able to use your bathroom without needing a tutorial. And I wanted to know which features (such as oscillating streams, wide sprays, and air dryers) were just frills, and which ones I would actually want to use everyday.

We loved seeing well-designed control panels and remotes, fine-grained temperature and pressure controls, variable stream options, and self-cleaning nozzles. We had mixed feelings about dryers, pre-mist functions that spray the bowl before you go, and feminine-wash functions (though that last item comes standard on electronic bidets). Stuff we don’t think you need: a UV light, a deodorizer, or an enema option (though many bidets are strong enough to act like one).

The most critical part of a bidet is that the water feels nice hitting your bottom. What qualifies as a nice-feeling stream is very personal, of course, so at minimum a good bidet should have a lot of options to customize pressure and temperature over a wide range. In testing, I found that it was difficult for a stream to be too soft for my taste, and that even the lowest-pressure stream on all the bidet seats I tested did a good job of cleaning me in a timely manner. Position controls are standard on most electronic bidets and are helpful in moving the perfected water stream exactly where it needs to go.

It’s important that the water gets warm but not too hot. I had read an anecdote about a burn allegedly caused by a bidet, so I measured the temperature of the water on the highest setting; the highest temperature registered at just over 100 degrees Fahrenheit, so, perfectly safe. Some bidets don’t get hot enough, however, and still others take several seconds to heat up completely. It can be hard to determine those qualities from the product description—your best bet is to do a careful read of reviews. We don’t think “tankless” bidets are necessary for most people: Though they can provide continuous hot water once they get going, unlike most of the bidets I tested, such models do not keep heated water on reserve, so the stream will take several seconds to begin at all. Most tank models provide over a minute of hot water at medium pressure, which should be enough time for most people. And bidets with tanks heat up new water within about minutes. Even in my apartment with four roommates, we never ran out of hot water.

Many bidets offer additional options to vary the flow of water, into a wide stream, a pulsating stream (also called a “massage” on some bidets), or an oscillating stream. I liked all of these. Roommate Theresa wasn’t a fan of the wide stream (a rarer feature), noting that it felt “untargeted.” Luckily, such options are easy to ignore if you dislike them, and since they are either on or off, they don’t take up a lot of space on a remote. They’re a bonus on any bidet.

One remote-crowding feature is the “auto” cycle, which a few of our tested bidets had. At the push of a button, they go through a routine of a stream of water, a massage function, and then air drying (more on that in a minute). The whole thing generally lasts two minutes, much longer than the water-then-wipe process reasonably takes. My roommates observed that no one really has time to sit on the toilet for the length that the auto cycle requires.

When some bidets are done spraying your butt with water, they’ll then blow-dry it, too. In The New York Times, tech columnist Farhad Manjoo describes the feel of the air-dry feature following being sprayed as “sort of like being pushed through a carwash.” I agree, and in the glow of the Toto showroom, I liked the feature. But when I got home, I found that it wasn’t practical; I’d need to sit there for several minutes to get fully dry. The airflow on the bidets I tested never went above 1miles per hour, even at maximum speed.

We had mixed feelings about the feminine-wash function, which every tested seat had. If you have a vagina, this function seems designed to squirt water into it. As UC Berkeley’s Dr. John Swartzberg noted to me, it’s not necessary to wash your vagina, and doing so regularly is potentially damaging. I didn’t use the function, but my roommates did, to freshen up after a long day. The function seemed to be hard to use to clean the wider, external area, as that doesn’t really seem to be the intention of the feature. “I end up wiggling around a lot,” reported Theresa.

Flaws but not dealbreakers

When I first put the Toto Washlet C200 on my toilet and sat down, it sounded as if it were preparing for takeoff. The culprit was the deodorizer, and it was loud. Normally I had to prompt my roommates to give me notes on a new bidet, but they were proactive about their opinions here: hard dislike. Luckily, the deodorizer was easy to turn off. I didn’t detect a big benefit to having the deodorizer on for any of the bidets that I tested with that feature, and I won’t hesitate to tell you that you’ll be fine without it.

That some of the buttons are on the back of the C200’s remote can get a little annoying—it’s the only remote that I had to remove from the wall sometimes. But the clean, uncrowded design that comes with the maximized use of space is enough of a bonus to make this annoyance worth putting up with.

Bidet attachments hook into the pipe that carries water to your toilet tank. Even if you’re not especially hardware-savvy, they are easy to install.

I found this washlet slightly harder to install than the other models. The adapter that siphons water to the bidet attaches to the piping next to the toilet tank, rather than to the wall. I found accessing that spot with tools to be more difficult, because of the way my toilet is positioned close to my bathroom wall. Still, it wasn’t that much harder to navigate—and with any bidet you buy, you should make sure you have enough room to maneuver a wrench.

The air dryer isn’t strong enough that you can forgo toilet paper, unless you are very patient. Still, the speed is comparable to that of dryers on more-expensive bidets. While I wouldn’t bother with this dryer, I also couldn’t find a better one.

Electric bidets connect to an outlet in your bathroom. Mine is in a sort of awkward place, but the cord ultimately didn’t bother me that much.

The electric cord is also a little annoying to look at, but that was an issue with every bidet I tested at home. The only outlet in my bathroom is above the sink, so the cord extends awkwardly from the toilet across the wall. You can find a variety of relatively inexpensive options for concealing and streamlining cables (the kind you’d use in an office) that could be put to use here.

The lid has a lip that, when closed, covers the gap between the lid and the seat. When it’s open, if you lean far back on the seat, you might feel it. This wasn’t a problem for us during testing, but a reader who leans back while using the toilet pointed out that it was bothersome.

After nearly a year of use, the sticky part on the back of the remote holder has lost some of its stickiness, so occasionally the remote falls down. This is a minor problem (and was exacerbated by the fact that I pulled the remote holder off the wall several times during testing). If you can’t screw the remote holder into the wall because of tile, you might need to get fresh double-sided adhesive every so often.

When I went apartment hunting with my boyfriend, I found myself (to the confusion of our broker) examining the toilets for shape and plumbing fixtures, to see if the Toto could come with us. We ended up in a place where the valves the bidet would need to attach to were crammed in a hard-to-reach spot—installation would be challenging, at best. I’ve left the bidet with my old roommates, for now, who were thrilled: Theresa’s face lit up when I told her I’d be loaning the device at least until I got settled enough to take on a minor plumbing experiment. I texted her and Olivia to get their thoughts on a year of using bidets: “I don’t like using toilets without bidets,” Theresa said. “Same,” Olivia agreed.

If you want to save a few bucks or if our top pick is sold out, we recommend going with the slightly pared-down version of the C200, the Toto Washlet C100. It has just as many water-pressure settings, as well as an option for an oscillating water stream (but no pulsing) and a pre-mist function to keep matter from sticking to the bowl. Although it offers only three temperature settings for the water, the stream can get just as warm on this model as with the C200.

If you want to outfit your bathroom with an electric bidet for as little money as possible, go with the Brondell Swash 300. This model is bare-bones (or, as bare-bones as a luxury product can be): It has a heated seat, six options each for water pressure and temperature, and both rear and feminine wash. Unlike the pricier version of the Brondell, according to a spokesperson for the company, on this model the water stream will begin quickly but might take a moment to warm up. On the positive side, the Swash 300 has a remote that affixes to the wall, a feature typically reserved for more expensive bidets.

After nearly a year of testing in a two-person apartment, the tankless version of the Swash 300, the Swash 900, has held up well. Our tester reports that waiting for the water to start is a bit annoying, but our pick, the Swash 300, does not have this issue nearly to the same degree (no bidet starts squirting water as soon as you push the button).

Toilet seat size

Like toilets, bidets come in two shapes. “Elongated,” or egg-shaped, toilet seats are more common these days, but if your toilet is on the small side, it might be round. If you’re not sure which kind you have, you’ll probably get it right just by eyeballing.

If you have an elongated toilet, picking a bidet size is a no-brainer: Go with the elongated one.

Unless you are feeling a little adventurous, I suggest selecting the appropriate bidet size for your toilet. I did most of my testing with elongated bidets installed on my round toilet, and overall my roommates and I liked the elongated size better. The longer seats still fit on round toilets, and they make such toilets feel larger. They hang over the front a bit, but having the feel of a bigger toilet made up for the cosmetic issue. However, there’s a big caveat: The holes on the base of most elongated bidets—which you’re supposed to use to attach the seat to the toilet with big plastic screws—are too far apart to match up with the holes on the back of a round toilet. I found that the bidets were secure enough with just one screw during our short-term testing (and could take further securing with adhesive tape). But I could see this being a nuisance for some people, especially during long-term use.

Bio Bidet BB-600

The Bio Bidet BB-600 gets the job done just fine. It doesn’t look or feel as nice as our top pick. But if you prefer colorful buttons over a black-and-white or black-and-gray interface—which the BB-600 has on its side-panel display—go with this model.

My main complaint about this bidet is that in our tests the water pressure was higher than our top pick’s, even on its lowest setting. But setting the mode to “aerated” fixed that issue. During the washing process, the water was a bit cooler than our top pick’s, even on the highest temperature setting, but not uncomfortably so. The button that controls water pressure is the same one that controls air-drying strength, which could be annoying if you intend to use the air dryer and also prefer a soft water stream.

Brondell Swash 900

We found two dealbreakers with this bidet: It’s slow and it’s noisy. It took a full 1seconds between our pushing the button and our feeling the stream of water—a PR rep for the company confirmed this was typical—whereas other models we tested took about seconds. Those extra seconds feel long. To boot, the bidet made a whirring noise during that whole time.

This bidet defaults to beeping a lot, making noise when it detects pressure on the seat as well as to indicate that a function—say, water temperature—is at its highest or lowest setting. “Why does it have to talk to me every time I sit down?” asked my roommate Olivia. Luckily, you can turn that option off.

The Swash 900 did have one feature that I wish every bidet had: a wide spray. I liked this option, as the wide spray felt softer than the more concentrated streams of water from the other models I tested. Theresa didn’t like the feel of the wide stream (she noted that it felt inconsistent, illustrating the effect by making a “pffffffft” spitting sound). Fortunately, the remote offers three options for width. The wide spray, however, didn’t seem to make a difference in how clean we felt; the other models were just as good in that regard. So although I liked the wide-spray feature, I wouldn’t overlook this model’s poor speed and irritating sound.

Bio Bidet BB-2000

This one was a favorite in my apartment, but its high price buys you many features that you don’t need. Olivia noted that the remote was intuitive to use but filled with more buttons than she would ever need—in addition to pressure and temperature settings, it offers a massage function, an enema function, an auto wash, a kids’ wash, something called a bubble infusion, and a wide spray.

Several settings for pressure and temperature mean that this bidet will suit a variety of personal preferences. An LED screen makes it clear what the current settings are, and adjusting them is easy. In our tests the pressure was always effective, and never too much.

The wide spray is really nice, and I wish all bidets had such a thing. But the remote was so crowded that it took me until I actually looked at the list of features on the bidet to realize the wide option was there.

I really liked the BB-2000’s blue night-light; it was surprisingly pleasant to use the toilet at night and not have to turn on the main light. Since it’s easy to purchase a separate night-light (in my case, a battery-powered one, since outlets in my bathroom are precious), this feature is nice but not a dealmaker.

The BB-2000 is also pretty large. As a result, it was comfortable to sit on, but we also ended up with a little splashing back of water after each use.

A note on other formats

Non-electric bidets have lower prices and offer only an adjustable—sometimes warm—stream of water, nothing else. Although we didn’t test such models, I spent some time reading about non-electric bidets and looking at reviews, and I talked to half a dozen Wirecutter readers who had had great experiences with them (including one who estimated that he has ordered a total of as gifts and for family members who wanted help making the all-important but perhaps slightly embarrassing purchase).

But even Bidet.org’s Kyle Bazylo, who sells travel bidets, says he doesn’t bother using one when he travels himself.

Side Latches And Handles

Has included twin side latches and handles to keep the waste tank attached to the flush tank for carrying around easily.

Being easy to set up is the main feature that makes Leopard Outdoor Portable Toilet the best toilet to invest in.

Easy To Set Up

When on a trip, you don’t need complicated things that is why clean waste go anywhere portable toilet takes a few seconds to set up and no assembly required.

The toilet is super strong it supports up to 500lbs. The toilet is also stable even on uneven terrain. The removable cover also multi-tasks as ground support.

Perfectly designed for traveling. It can be folded to briefcase size for easy storage and to top it all, it has a built-in carry handle.

Compatible Design

About the Reliance Fold to go portable toilet’s design being ideally suited for the doodie bag bagging system, it, therefore, comes with one free double doodie bag.

Leg Locking System ​Reliance folds to go portable toilets constitutes an irresistible highly innovated leg locking system making it one of the strongest and best portable toilet in the globe.

 

 

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the portable toilet by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

Final Word

First of all thanks for reading my article to the end! I hope you find my reviews listed here useful and that it allows you to make a proper comparison of what is best to fit your needs and budget. Don’t be afraid to try more than one product if your first pick doesn’t do the trick.

Most important, have fun and choose your portable toilet wisely! Good luck!

So, TOP3 of portable toilet

 

 

Questions? Leave a comment below!

Chatting about portable toilet is my passion! Leave me a question in the comments, I answer each and every one and would love to get to know you better!



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